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Rainy day woman

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Rainy day woman

Corene Matyas

Assistant Professor of Geography
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

For her research on the frequency and intensity of hurricanes, Corene Matyas couldn’t have picked a better state to call home. Since receiving her doctorate in climatology from The Pennsylvania State University in 2005, she has continued her study of tropical storms as a scholar at the University of Florida.

“At the age of 4, I realized that one cannot hide from severe weather events,” Matyas said. “Consequently, I vowed to learn everything I could about hurricanes, tornadoes, floods and other natural disasters because I wanted to be prepared when severe weather struck.”

While her research interests include all types of severe weather and natural hazards in general, Matyas’ current work focuses on hurricanes. Specifically, she is investigating the use of geographical methods such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and the calculation of shape indices to quantify tropical cyclone rainfall patterns. Her long-term goal is to develop a model to forecast these rainfall patterns as storms make landfall.

During the summer of 2006, Matyas was invited by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Hurricane Research Division to give a seminar on her work at the National Hurricane Center in Miami. She gained the organization’s attention after presenting a paper titled “Relating Tropical Cyclone Rainfall Patterns to Storm Size” at the American Meteorological Society’s Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology in April.

Matyas also recently presented her work at the 2006 annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers in Chicago in a lecture titled, “Relating the Shapes of Landfalling Tropical Cyclone Rain Shields to Storm Intensity, Distance Inland, and Topography.” In February, she presented “Quantifying the Effects of Wind Shear on Tropical Cyclone Rain Shields” at the Florida Society of Geographers Annual Meeting in St. Petersburg.

In addition to her active research career, Matyas also teaches Climatology, Weather and Forecasting, and Extreme Weather.